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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
, for her introduction of this bill and her comments honoring the memory of mr. kling. he truly was a caring, a compassionate and a loyal person and a loyal friend that made everyone who crossed his path feel as though they were the most special person he knew. finally, mr. speaker, when we announced that legislation to rename this facility at the facility, there was some veterans standing out in front waiting to go in. and they asked what the hubbub was about. they asked why all the tv cameras and i explained to them who bill kling was and why this was being done. they were grateful to know and veterans just like those veterans when they walk through the front door, will not only learn about bill kling but his example for continuing to work hard every single day for his fellow veterans. what a great honor we're bestoge on his family and by -- destowing on his family. -- bestowing on his family. i ask my colleagues to support this bill honoring this great american. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i have no further speakers. the speaker pro tempo
to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocated for support for nasa
greatly. they are senator kay bailey hutchison and senator scout brown. mr. president, in her marvelous book entitled "american heroines: the spirited women who shaped our country," senator kay bailey hutchison wrote the following: "no history can be written appropriately without acknowledging the part women have played in building the greatness of our country. end quote. as my valued colleague and good friend begins a new chapter in her life, i hope that she finds the time to add a new chapter to her own book, one that will be fascinating, inspiring, and auto biographical. like the women that kay celebrates, says an author from amelia earheart, from sally barton to condoleezza rice, kay bailey hutchison is a pioneer, a breaker of barriers. in the special election of 1993, the people of texas made her the first woman to represent them in the united states senate. in the three regular elections since then, they have confirmed their trust in her by ever increasing margins. as the leader of the senate commerce committee, kay has been a strong voice for transportation systems, better, effic
of her time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers. does the gentlelady have further speakers? ms. hochul: i'd like to yield such time to the ranking member of the homeland subcommittee on transportation security, homeland security, the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized. ms. jackson lee: i want to thank the gentlelady from new york and i want to say first of all this will not be the last that we hear of your voice. and what a stupendous voice you have. thank you so very much for making this time on the floor a time that pays tribute to veterans, but also recognizes the outstanding service that you've given to this nation, to the committee on homeland security and your other committees, but more importantly, the passion that you've shown as a true american. i hope that we heed the voice that you just lifted up, that we owe to veterans not only this great legislation, but also the ability to come together and work on their behalf and all americans. again, t
of the economic growth. could he be any mcdreamier. >> her rep conference that mr. and mrs. rock'n'roll way in your earlier this month. only a few friends and her children were in attendance. isd marriage. randy can say the boy is mi >> parade begins a the boy's mind. she is encased in a executive at a record company. for hollywood minute i am hollywoodcorridan. >> tens of thousands of people are gone and san diego to watch the 16 winner schnitzel winter nationals. >> each-teldachshuknds raced at a 56 ft. track $4,000 prize and the title fastest when a dog. >> oscar a brown sachshuknd from tustin, arizona was the winner. >> preparations are underway for the family and your cue ball dropped a times square in new york city. >> workers installed waterford crystal triangles in the ceremonial ball yester day. >> the ball with his 288 crystal panels will drop down at 141 ft. tall floc flagpole to usher in the new year. >> the crystal panels have those children to them for the theme let there be peace. >> coming up on the kron 4 morning news at 5:00 talks continue in washington today as the countr
in her eyes and she said, mrs., summers, we all wish for that for our children. >> we are so sorry for you and we hope you one day do get to bring preston home to your home. >> thank you. >> dr. jane aronson is a pediatrician and international adoption specialist. she is the founder and ceo of worldwide orphans foundation. and she joins me now. tough interview, certainly for these families to see what they're going through. i see you're even emotional having watched that just now. what do you make of what's going on here? what do you make of this bill, and what do you think is the motivation behind it? >> i think it's very simple. this is a retaliation, a political maneuver. the russian and american relationships, the relationship between america and russia is in a disaster relationship at this point, but what's really important is first to focus on what we can do to advocate for the families because there are hundreds of families involved, and this is something that has been part of russian adoptions for 25 years. as long as russian adoption has been around, it's been a problem th
is recovering at home after fainting and hitting her head. the concussion she suffered is expected to prevent mrs. clinton from appearing this week before two congressional committees looking at the attack in benghazi, libya that killed four americans including the u.s. ambassador. south africa says that former president nelson mandela underwent surgery for gallstones yesterday. the operation on the 94-year-old was described as successful. now today's weather, rain is likely east of the mississippi and along the west coast. there they are also bracing for snow. the week ahead will start with scattered storms, and will end with the official start of winter. ,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, >> osgood: friday's awful events in newtown, connecticut bring back some all too familiar questions. how could this have happened? and what can be done? here is martha tischner. >> caller is indicating that she thinks someone is shooting in the building. >> reporter: somehow the idea that little children had been shot made it worse. >> we heard a lot more than, the ambulance came, then the policemen told us to run out of
and tough lows of this job. so i want to thank her. also, mr. speaker, our two great sons, austin and andrew. they have shared me with thousands of constituents for several years that they have grown into amazing young men, young men that i think will in their own right make a difference as they work their way through their lives. and, mr. speaker, i want to also thank some amazing staff. two it it it names, dozens over many years, four in particular -- too numerous to name, dozenings over the years, some who worked with me the entire years i worked in this congress, jeremy, who has staffed the foreign affairs committee for me, and the oversight subcommittee, also has been my chief of staff in the washington office. jim who has been my district director and long time friend and colleague until st. louis. suzanne arthur, who has been my deputy director. and kathy walz from missouri, former mayor there, but invaluable part of our constituent outreach team. many other staff, but those in particular, thank them for their long and loyal service and the difference they made in so many people's liv
judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president's willing to risk another recession in order to increase taxes on small businesses and the people we depend upon to create jobs. how much revenue will the president's tax hike generate? well, by raising the top two rates, it would produce only about $68 billion in 2013. i say "only," because in relationship to
the evidence prove? and frankly, her lawyer, mr. bill cherry, is one of the finest attorneys in ft. lauderdale. he has the right to investigate this matter. and while being in the netherlands by itself is an innocuous fact, why aren't they answering these questions? >> that's not true. >> the trail of evidence will lead him to the end result, and if it's innocuous and there really is no mr. aguilar living and alive today, come forward and answer these questions. why can't they tell us what's going on? maybe there's more to the story, and that's why they're not coming forward. but the bottom line is this needs to be investigated, and jamie, as a surviving wife, has the right to know what the truth is concerning her husband. harris: tad? >> well, the bottom line here is if they're hiding money, it's easy to follow a paper trail of money. and this situation is no different than any other paper trail. also how hard would it be to get an investigator in the netherlands to look around, follow the money trail and see if they see anything that doesn't look proper? the bottom line is the only thing tha
? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: let me thank senator shaheen for her leadership on this issue. we've had many discussions about how to advance human rights issues and what is the best strategy to get the sergei magnitsky bill enacted into law. your leadership on the senate foreign relations committee on europe, your leadership in the helsinki commission, you've been one of the real champions on this issue. i just want to thank you, want to thank you for your good advice and for allowing us to be able to get us to this day. i'm convinced tomorrow the senate will pass this legislation. the president is going to sign it, and we will have achieved a great victory for human rights. i thank you. i think also your observations as we were talking about how to move forward with this bill in connection with pntr for russia and as senator lieberman talked about a little bit earlier, i am convinced as important as this bill was, that the magnitsky bill by itself would have been extremely difficult for us to get through for the president and for the president to sign and to b
, be the first child foor her and her husband, prince william. >>> mr. roker is here with a look at the weather. >> two big storms on both coasts. we start here in the northeast and the east coast. really, severe weather through the southeast today. winter storms going on right now in new england. we're talking about one to six inches of snow in parts of maine, one to three inches of rain down through the southeast. out west, we've got another big storm to talk about. this one is going to be causing blizzard warnings, winter storm weather advisories, winter weather advisories from the pacific northwest all the way into colorado. snowfall amounts anywhere from one to two feet of snow in the cascades, about one to two inches of rain along the california coast. we'll have your local forecast but first this message.ge. >>> good morning. i'm storm team 4 meteorologist tom kierein. we have had patchy dense fog. more sprinkles in northern maryland and northern west virginia headed into the metro area over the next several hours. between now and then, clouds, patchy dense fog. in the 40s for much of re
adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe mated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you couldn't move without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you are a little breathless and it was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> he is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. >> they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now, you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am
. it probably was exactly the wrong time pause of his weakened condition. >> mr. bush is the country's oldest living president. his doctors are cautiously optimistic. >> david lee miller, thank you. >>> the head of the environmental protection agency, lisa jackson, is leaving her post. in a statement, she said she will leave the epa confident the ship is sailing the right direction. the president released a statement praising lisa jackson for taking steps to protect our air and water, helping to combat climate change and passing new fuel economy standards. republican lawmakers and industrial groups often accused her and the epa of killing jobs, making it harder for american companies to compete on the world stage. >>> every year thousands of american families save russian children from horrific conditions but that could stop. critics say it's all because russia's president is making a political ploy. we speak with a family about their efforts to adopt a russian child and what the move means to them. pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webca
scoring partisan political points. it is her character that has made the difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character. i want to share my colleagues this morning a story about olympia snowe that i witnessed personally. there was a republican fund- raiser going on one night and i was arriving late driving in a car. people weren't streaming out of the fund-raiser and each of them was passing by a man who was on crutches with only one leg, clearly destitute, clearly down on his luck, but the was asking for money. everybody but olympia snowe passing by without a word as if he were invisible. olympia went over to this destitute man on crutches with one leg and she not only handed him some money, but she took the time to talk to him. i think that tells you so much about who olympia snowe is. her kindness to this individual when everyone else was passing by. the kindness when no one was watching. her kindness to him was a private act that told all lost -- al of us so much about our character. it with her retirement from the senate,
the end of the summer pickup were to carson and her asian was not going to publish the chapter. they were going to publish township tours. the effect that was enormous. before this year by mrs. published as a book, he was destined to be a bestseller, which it did and it turned carson immediately into a household name and as i said earlier, one of the most famous writers in america. the sea around us was number one on "the new york times" bestseller list for 39 straight weeks. it was on the bestsellers list for several years interesting at the time of the top 10, her publisher decided to reissue the earlier book from 1841 called under the sea wind, the one that disappeared without a trace it onto the bestseller lists for a period of time, rachel carson had two of the top 10 books in america at the same time on the bestseller list. the sea around us from the national book award, which is in its infancy at the time. the second or third time it has been awarded yet this is a picture at the awards banquet with the other winners that year. on the far left is mary ann moore to run for poetry and
, dropped from public view until her death in july. >> you haven't answered the question, mr. president. >> from space to time, mike wallace spent 60 years mostly on "60 minutes" and most often afflicting the comfortable with his confrontational style of journalism. wallace died in april. another television star, dick clark, was the maker of teen idols on "american bandstand" and rang in the new year for america for nearly four decades. as familiar as the whistle that opens his tv show, andy griffith planned to be a preacher or opera singer but settled on acting which he did up until his death in july. when larry hagman was shot as j.r. ewing on "dallas," it was the most watched point in his career that gan -- began on "i dream of jeannie." and joe paterno was sullied by the child sex abuse scandal at penn state that broke just before his death in january. etta james died in january 50 years after her version of "at last" became a must at millions of weddings. whitney houston died in february. ♪ i will always love you ♪ >> donna summer, in may. and some unique sounds fell silent, to
. i join with the entire senate family in wishing her and john the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, in these closing days of the 112th congress, the senate is saying farewell to again one of our most popular and respected members, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico. when jeff came to this body 30 years ago, he had already led a life of accomplishment created in small-town new mexico, silver city. he was an eagle scout, graduated from harvard college, stanford law school, where he met his future wife, ann. while at stanford, he worked in senator robert f. kennedy's campaign for president. at the age of 35, he was elected new mexico attorney general in 1978. and four years later at the age of 39, elected to the united states senate. during his three decades in this body, jeff bingaman has been a classic workhorse senator as opposed to being a show horse senator. he is truly remarkable and distinctive among senators for his willingness to shun the limelight and share the credit in order to get important things done for his state and for this country. senator bingaman has b
, because it makes no sense. >> reporter: sense is something garcia's wife of 59 years thinks her husband could use. do you think he is crazy? >> well -- >> reporter: call him crazy. but there is an entire federal office, the bureau of public debt that collects money from hundreds of mr. garcias. this office in parkersburg, west virginia, was set up by president kennedy so citizens could pay down the national debt. this year alone it collected 7.7 million in gifts, about 90 million since it was established. but 90 million is not that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says you got to start somewhere, especially when washington won't. the partisan fighting has bothered him since? 1992, when he first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to put down the debt. the veteran says he is giving back to a country that has given him so much. a sense of duty, that is infectious. his daughter is now collecting cans at work. his grandson drives garcia to friends' hous
, says her boss won't be leaving the hospital anytime soon. he is in intensive care with complications from bronchitis. but she says the 88-year-old mr. bush would advise to put the harps back in the closet. because he's getting excellent treatment. >>> and secretary of state hillary clinton will return to work next week. she hasn't been seen in public since suffering a concussion about two weeks ago after a fainting spell brought on by a stomach bug. >>> and the fiscal cliff in washington isn't the only major threat to the u.s. economy. this morning, time is running out to avoid a strike by 14,000 dockworkers from boston to houston for demanding better pay. 14 ports which handle half of the nation's shipping traffic are threatened. workers could walk off the job this sunday, costing the economy an estimated $1 billion per day. >>> and for the second time this month, someone has been pushed to their death on a new york subway. a woman seen running away on the left side of this surveillance video, right here, shoved a man on to the tracks last night. he was then crushed by an oncoming t
and is testament to her strength and her spirit. the people of maine and america are grateful for her many years of service. i am grateful for her leadership and her friendship. and i know that olympia snowe will continue to influence national policy for many years to come. mr. president, we have a tradition in the senate of referring to our colleagues on the senate floor during debate as "my friend from this state" or "my friend from that state," and oftentimes the word "friend" really just means colleague. but there is a fellow senator whom i call friend in the truest sense of the word, and that person, mr. president, is the senior senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, includ
. cent 1600 dollars and the press was tough on her which is fuby when we lock at how much they spent today. >> steve: i remember in the reagan term. mrs. reagan used to have celebrity secret santas >> she was. she was all about glits and glamour and this white house is what you wanted to so. she had mr. t and larry hagman was a celebrity sant a. >> there is mr. t. >> gretchen: and finally laura bush. you were instrumental to helping . >> she invited me to be a part of the decorating team. it was elegance and being understated and red, white and blue christmas and incorporated books and stories and made it enchanting for children. it is christmas with the first ladies and beautiful stories and pictures as well. >> thank you so much for having me. >> gretchen: merry christmas. >> steve: thieves try to rip off a church and get a shock instead. >> brian: high school basketball team ends with a score of 107-2 . the coach of the losing team is here next. ♪ this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable
of the nurse who took her own life after getting duped by their prank call. >>> good morning, to you. welcome to "early start." welcome back, mr. berman. >> it is great to be here. i was on vacation for a week. now i'm back. i'm john berman. it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. i am feeling that. but this, they are talking for the first time in over three weeks. president obama and house speaker john boehner looked each other in the eye and actually had a conversation. now that's a really big deal when it comes to the fiscal cliff crisis. because in just 22 days americans face severe tax hikes and spending cuts unless these two leaders can find a way to compromise. now neither side would discuss specifics about their conversation. but after yesterday's white house meeting, a spokesman for the president said "the lines of communication remain open." now that may be music to the ears of former white house chief of staff erskine bowles, one half of the bowles-simpson reduction duo. >> they started a tango now. you know, any time you got two guys in there tangoing, you have a chance to get it done. >> br
the centerpieces home with you. >> coming up on c-span, california rep and democrat lynn woolsey delivers her farewell address from the house floor. followed by a tribute by other members of congress to outgoing california representatives. mr. speaker, throughout my career in public life and even before nothing has motivated me more than a desire to end wars and violent conflict. when i was a small girl, saying bedtime ayers or making a birthday wish blowing out the candles, i always asked for world peace. so no surprise that over a decade ago i opposed the iraq war before it even started. it was appalling that we would invade a nation that hadn't provoked us, had nothing to do with 9/11, and did not have weapons of mass destruction. it was a lonely fight at that time. but i didn't do it to be loved. it was a matter of principle. barbara lee, maxinwaters, and i formed the triad, woolsey-waters-lee to organize our opposition. we held forums. we developed and out of iraq caucus. we traveled around the country. and in january, 2005, i offered the first amendment here on the house floor calling f
it makes no sense. >> reporter: sense something garcia's wife of 59 years thinks her husband could use. do you think he's crazy? >> loco? >> reporter: call him crazy, but there is an entire federal office, the bureau of public debt, that collects money from hundreds of mr. garcias. this office in parkersburg, west virginia, was set up by president kennedy, so citizens could pay down the national debt. this year alone, it's collected $7.7 million in gifts, about $90 million since it was established. but $90 million isn't that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says, you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since -- >> 1992. >> reporter: that's when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the death. the depression era kid and army veteran says he's giving back to a country that's given him so much. a sense that's infectious. his daughter is now collecting cabs at work. his g
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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